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December 2018

When to Fire Underperformers - Aaron Sansoni

When To Fire Underperformers

560 315 Aaron Sansoni

If you’ve ever managed any type of metric-driven team, then you are aware that there will be performance rockstars and there will be performance duds. The rockstars are easier to handle. They do their job and they do it well. The underperformers, however, tend to be trickier. How do you know when to invest company time, energy, and money in their improvement and when to cut your losses and let them go? Fortunately, there is an easy way to make this decision by asking yourself one simple question:

Is this a skill problem, or is it a will problem?

Skill Problems

Skill problems are markedly straightforward. There is some aspect of the employees performance that can be corrected by addressing a lack of knowledge or know-how. If your underperformer has the potential to do their job given the right amount of time or education, then they are certainly worth keeping. It’s when they don’t want to do their job that a critical issue arises.

Will Problems

Will problems are difficult. They occur when an employee lacks the drive or ambition to perform in their role. They may have all of the right skills and qualities that a rockstar performer does but if they aren’t willing to put in the work, or don’t see the value in doing so, then they will never add value to your team. If you determine that an employee is underperforming because of will problem, then it’s time to let them go.

The Termination Conversation

It’s important to approach a termination conversation in a strategic manner. It’s not enough to sit the employee down and say “You’re fired.” It’s not practical to engage them in a lengthy conversation that establishes you as a friend. Both options position you as a foe in the long run. If you find yourself in a situation that requires the termination of a team member, it’s best to conduct the conversation by acknowledging your failure.

Realistically, if you haven’t provided a team member with the drive, motivation, or inspiration to perform in their role then you have failed them. You’ve hired them incorrectly and you’ve managed them incorrectly. By accepting the blame at the start of the conversation, you’re automatically relieving some of the tension that automatically bubbles up when an employee is about to be fired. Do not dwell on their failures. It only draws out what should be a short, frank conversation. Merely inform the employee that you’ve failed at giving them what they need and, as a result, they have been unable to meet your company needs. Thus it’s time to part ways.

Addressing underperformance in this manner will eliminate some of the decision-making stress that so often comes with tough calls. Determine whether your employee can do the job, and whether they want to do the job…and then proceed accordingly.

Aaron Sansoni - Telemarketing Header

How NOT To Telemarket

560 315 Aaron Sansoni

Sales is a broad field. There are numerous different job opportunities in several different aspects of sales, and none of them are so universally hated as telemarketing. The field of telemarketing tends to elicit a negative reaction from anyone who has ever spent countless minutes on a phone being “sold” by someone with a script and an earpiece. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In fact, that’s the wrong way to do telemarketing.

If your business uses telemarketing as a sales tactic, then it’s imperative that you understand the behavioral process causing your potential customers to shut down as soon as they realize who is on the other end of the line. Here’s what most telemarketers are doing wrong.

They Ask For Value Up Front

The last thing a consumer wants to hear when they answer the phone is an immediate request for something that they may or may not have. Most telemarketers begin their conversations by asking for time or answers. This immediately sends the consumer into a wary state. It also puts them in a position to decline. They know they’re being sold and they haven’t been given any incentive to offer their valuable time or conversation to your team.

They Sell Themselves

A lot of telemarketers do not understand the difference between selling a product, selling a personality, or offering value. If they’ve received any type of affirmation or consent from the potential client in step one, they immediately jump into their sales pitch. Tactics here will vary from team to team, but the concept is universal. The salesperson feels like he or she is on borrowed time, so they attempt to cram as much information into a brief period as possible. Facts like product details and deadlines take precedence over value. Don’t get me wrong, occasionally one of those facts or figures will solve a problem the potential client has been facing. But the odds of that happening are significantly less if the seller hasn’t taken the time to understand the needs of the consumer. 

They Ask To Give The Value in Exchange For Money

The third and final step in most telemarketing calls is the request for funds. The marketer delivers their scripted lines and proceeds straight to the second commitment request of the conversation— money. The potential client, having already given their time or answers, is now being asked to give yet again before the telemarketer gives them any real value in return. You can understand how this might be a problematic process.

Fortunately for sales teams around the world, telemarketing does not have to follow this precarious path. It stands to reason that if there’s a wrong way to do it, then surely there must be a right way. I can teach you the correct way to leverage telemarketing as a valid way to recruit customers to your sales funnel. For more information visit AaronSansoni.com and click BootCamp.